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PURCHASING a PIANO

ACQUIRING A PIANO

             Students are required to have an acoustic piano within the first six months of study.  
             A digital piano is a workable solution for beginners, but wholly inadequate for developing quality 
             technique and true musicality.  If you do purchase a keyboard for the initial study period, it needs
             to be full-size, with weighted keys.

             I recommend the Steinway rent-to-own program. Their Essex and Boston lines are affordable 
             student-level instruments (c.$80/month), which can later be traded in for full credit.  
             Betsy Hirsch: 212-332-0131  BHirsch@steinway.com

            Steinway also have factory sales several times a year, where you may a good used instrument they previously received as a 
            trade-in.

            Everyone needs an adjustable, comfortable bench, and a footstool until the child is tall enough to reach the floor.  
            An unbalanced sitting position at an incorrect height makes proper technique impossible.

            Beethoven Pianos (NYC) also have a rental program. B Natural Pianos in Rockaway, NJ are worth the trip- excellent prices             and a 10 year warranty. You can also find some nice things on pianomart.com

            When purchasing a used instrument, check out the brand/model descriptions and standard price range in Larry Fine’s ‘The             Piano Book”. This is the equivalent of “The Blue Book” for cars: http://www.pianobuyer.com/pianobook.html

            It is always worth getting the objective opinion of an independent, registered piano technician. This should cost c.$75-100.  
            They may also know of suitable instruments currently available.  
            Recommended:  Scot Lockhart.  212-489-6171  http://www.happypianotuner.com

            Recommended brands: Baldwin, Boston, Cable & Hobart, Chickering, Essex, Everett, Kawai, Steinway, Story & Clark, 
            Mason & Hamlin, Yamaha. 

            Brands to avoid: Young Chang, Pearl River, and anything with a fancy Italian name that was not in fact made in Italy. 
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